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Regency Mens Clothing (1800 - 1850)


As fashion promenaded into the Regency era (1800s - 1820s) and strolled into the Romantic era (1830s-1850s), men's style stepped away from the once-popular look of a powdered-wig peacock and toward that of a notably understated yet impeccably dressed dandy. Gone were flamboyant vests, coats and pantaloons cut from rich fabrics in vivid colors adorned with elaborate embroidery. High heels worn with knee-length breeches and stockings also fell out of favor.

Instead, the Regency gentleman began donning more practical fabrics such as wool, cotton and buckskin - shapes and drapes changed as well. Limited availability of fine textiles during the French Revolution, along with the fear of looking aristocratic enough to be delivered to the guillotine, were partially behind this swing toward a more sedate silhouette.

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Complete Regency Outfits


We offer a full line of men's period clothing which are suitable for movie and TV production, theatrical, living history and performing arts requirements, and are also perfect for vintage weddings!

All of the products we sell are sold individually, but we have put together these full outfits to showcase the elements of Regency style for your consideration and inspiration.

Click any image for a close-up and a list of the products shown.


Mens Regency Collection


Elements of Regency Style


Although men's fashion in the early 1800s was less conspicuous in construction and color, it was in no way unkempt or worn without discernment. Setting the era's high standards for dressing and deportment was Beau Brummel, an English dandy, friend of royals and high society hob-nobber.

This arbiter of fashion brought focus to the quality of fabric and accuracy of the cut over the lavishness of the embroidery and color. This influence continues today in the staid blues, browns and blacks of most men's suits. Fastidious and with the finest of tastes, Brummel was known to spend extraordinary amounts of time and money on his wardrobe - some say he even polished his boots with champagne!

Regency Top Hats - Rather than the tricorn of yesteryear, the true gentleman wore a top hat made from silk, wool felt or beaver pelt. Some of these "toppers" were designed with springs to be collapsible for easy storage at the opera and theatre.

Regency Mens Shirts - Shirts, almost exclusively white, featured starched chin-high necks to accommodate an array of elaborate cravats. Partial front plackets buttoned half way down and were frequently festooned with ruffles.

Elaborate Regency Tie/Cravat - The color and knot of a cravat were the cornerstone in a gentleman's ensemble, speaking to both his rank and valet's skill. It is rumored that the meticulous Beau Brummel was so particular about this punctuating accessory that he would often tie 20 cravats before he was satisfied.

Regency Coats - A fitted tailcoat was de rigueur, typically tailored in a solid color with a contrast lapel and collar. Coats often featured padded shoulders to visually narrow the middle - some gentlemen donned corsets to achieve a desirable wasp-waisted shape.

Regency Waistcoat or Vest - On the scene were straight bottom waistcoats with a slim fit. Often the tailcoat worn over the waistcoat was cut short so that approximately 2-inches would peek from the bottom

Regency Pants - Full-length trousers found favor over knickers that stopped at the knee. Rather than the zippered opening of modern day, Regency pants had a flap panel called a fall that opened in the front and fastened with buttons. The fall could be broad or narrow and over the decades tapered to the standard button fly we know today.

Regency Footwear - The high-heeled, big-buckled and often jewel-bedecked shoes of the 18th century gave way to leather laced shoes and knee-length boots and heels were relegated to full court dress only.

When out of uniform, house servants of the rich often wore hand-me-downs deemed too dirty or outmoded to keep in rotation. Mass produced, inexpensive clothing was not a commodity until later in the Victorian era, so even hand-me-down garments were repurposed once more by being sold to the laboring poor.

Over the decades, these styles changed as necklines and hemlines moved up or down, but the general cut of coats and pants remain recognizable until the latter part of the 1850s as full skirted Frock Coats begin to dominate the fashion scene. Our Regency ensembles are ideal for your favorite Jane Austen gentleman or your own version of Beau Brummel.

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Extraordinary Service